top of page
  • Will

Fan First - The MFB Artist Interview with DJ 80P

Updated: Dec 29, 2022


Adam Pesola (DJ 80P) released his first song with MF this past month, and it’s a joyous and stunning slice of house-y dance pop. After a 20-year journey as a fan, he began producing his own tracks in 2020. We chatted with him this week.

MFB: When did you first become a fan of electronic music?

Adam: Twenty years ago, when I was growing up in the suburbs of Chicago, house music was on the radio, albeit late at night, and I got hooked on DJs like DJ Markski, DJ Bam Bam, To Kool Chris, and Bobby D. The thumping beats and energy were infectious and from there I got into trance, euro, and vocal dance music (ATB, Above & Beyond, Darude). From there, around 2006, I was totally immersed and following/listening to many artists and DJs, and going to live events / parties when I could. I saw Deadmau5 in Arizona before he started using the mau5-head and the special effects cube! The electro-house sound was taking off then and I fell in love with the aforementioned Deadmau5, Kaskade, Wolfgang Gartner, Spencer & Hill, Adam K & Soha, and EDX, amongst many others. I know some of those artists were/are known for different genres, but I couldn't get enough.

MFB: Once you began making your own recordings, what was your goal?

Adam: I wanted to do it because I felt like I had years of listening, enjoying, and experiencing electronic music as a whole, that I had something to “say,” and wanted to see if I could do it. There are tons of resources out there, and with a little patience and an idea in mind, it is possible for anyone looking to start. If people enjoyed my work and it took off, GREAT! If not, that was OK as well. After making my first track, Niteshade, I was hooked and started to submit my other projects and tracks to labels that I enjoyed.

MFB: There is something so wonderful and succinct about your MF release Wallard. It feels as though every sound is right where it needs to be, and anything added or taken away would make it crumble. What is it about a recording that tells you it's done?

Adam: I think there is a such thing as “too much” fiddling or overdoing something, not just with music but anything in life, that at a certain point I was satisfied with the results and anything I did tweak or add / subtract from there was too much. If there was constructive feedback after the fact, then I would take that into consideration on the next production and move forward. I think it is important to set a high standard and keep going, but it is also equally important to know when to stop and appreciate the work done and move on or take a break.

MFB: What does success mean to you as a producer? Is it something external like getting plays or likes, or is it something more about pleasing yourself?